Graduate Dual Degree

SAIC's graduate dual degree option in Modern and Contemporary Art History, Theory, and Criticism and Arts Administration and Policy provides students with a means to earn two synergistic degrees as efficiently as possible while maintaining the integrity and high standards of each degree.

Application and Admissions Information

  • Priority Deadline: December 1 - $45 Application Fee
    Application Deadline: January 10 - $90 Application Fee
    Apply online via SlideRoom

    If you are also interested in applying to the Arts Administration program, please ONLY submit a single application to the Dual Degree: Modern & Contemporary Art History AND Arts Administration & Policy.

    SAIC requires applicants to apply online. Filing an online application requires a valid credit card and a current email address. You may apply to up to three programs with one application and fee. If you are applying to either the MFA in Studio or the Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Studio you may select up to three departments of entry.

    Applications must be submitted prior to 11:00 p.m. (CST) on the appropriate deadline. When you click the "submit" button on the Graduate Application form, you will be prompted to enter credit card information to pay the application fee. Your application form is not fully submitted until you have entered your credit card information.

    Under no circumstances will an application fee be waived or refunded. After you submit the application form you will be directed to a dashboard where you can begin working on your ePortfolio(s).

  • A conferred four-year baccalaureate degree or its equivalent is required for admission to all graduate programs at SAIC. Transcripts are records of your studies that list the courses you completed, the grades received, and provide evidence of degree conferral. They may include grade sheets, exam results, final diplomas, degrees, or graduation certificates. Official copies are issued in the original language directly by your university. Copies must bear the official stamp or seal of the institution, as well as the signature of the appropriate official such as the dean, rector, registrar, controller of examinations, or office of teaching affairs. Photos, notarized copies, facsimiles, or email transmissions are not acceptable.

    Official translations are expected for all educational documents issued in a language other than English. A translation agency or university language department should issue official translations typed on official stationary and the translator must attest proficiency in the original language and indicate their translations are accurate word-for-word.

    During the application process an unofficial transcript is acceptable for review pending an Admissions decision. Official transcripts are required upon admission. Include transcripts both official and unofficial from all universities/colleges from which a degree was obtained or prerequisites were fulfilled. You can attach unofficial transcripts as .pdf or .jpg files in the Educational History section of the application form. If you are in the process of completing a bachelor's degree when you apply, a transcript showing your first three years of study is acceptable.

    Transcripts are considered official if sent directly from the degree- or credit-granting institution to the SAIC Graduate Admissions Office. Hard copy transcripts are considered official if the documents remain in the registrar's original signed and sealed envelopes. Official transcripts can be sent both in digital and hard-copy format. Digital transcripts can be sent from the degree- or credit-granting institution to gradmiss@saic.edu. Hard copy transcripts can be mailed to:

    SAIC Graduate
    36 S. Wabash Ave., Suite 1201
    Chicago, IL 60603

    Students admitted to a graduate program who have not received a high school diploma, GED or equivalent are not eligible for federal Title IV financial aid funds. 

  • Please submit two responses in your statement of purpose document:

    • Write a 500- to 700-word statement of purpose that describes the history of your interests and experiences in Arts Administration, your personal and professional motivations and goals, and your reasons for pursuing graduate study at SAIC, and thoughts on potential future directions.
    • Write a 500 to 700 word statement that describes your Art History work or research. Discuss how you came to focus on the medium, body of work, or academic area you wish to pursue at the graduate level. Also discuss future directions or goals for your work, and describe how this area of study is particularly suited to your professional goals.

    A statement of intent is required for all graduate programs though the content varies by department. You will upload your statement of purpose to the Attachments section of your E-Portfolio.

  • 3 letters of reference are required.

    You are responsible for securing letters of recommendation from persons who are qualified to write about your potential for success at SAIC. If you are currently a student or are a recent graduate, we recommend you request letters of recommendation from current or former instructors.

    Letters of recommendation should be submitted electronically via the References section of the application form. In this section you will be asked to provide an email address for each of your references. Once you click "send request," an email will be sent from SlideRoom to your references with instructions on how to submit their recommendations online.

    If your references cannot provide an online recommendation please contact the Graduate Admissions office at gradmiss@saic.edu

  • A current résumé is required.

    A resume is required for all graduate programs. Upload your résumé to the Attachments section in your E-Portfolio.

  • For the Master of Arts in Arts Administration and Policy program, submit a sample of your critical writing, up to 2,000 words in length. This can be either an essay assignment from a previous course of study, an excerpt from a longer research paper, or a recently published article.

    For the Master of Arts in Modern and Contemporary Art History program, submit a 15 to 25 page critical writing sample that demonstrates knowledge of the field, ability in research, and clarity of argumentation. Submissions should be written on a topic in modern or contemporary art history from the 19th century to the present, but papers dealing with earlier historical eras will be accepted if they are in dialogue with current debates and methods. Additionally, topics dealing with relevant theories and philosophies, visual studies, and film studies will be considered.

    Applicants are required to submit an E-Portfolio, though the content varies by department. Please visit your individual program of interest to find details. You must submit a separate E-Portfolio for each program or studio department to which you apply. After you pay the application fee and submit the application form, an E-Portfolio for each of the programs you selected in the application form will automatically appear in your SlideRoom dashboard.

    Submission Specifications

    • Images: .jpg, .gif, .pdf (up to 5 MB each)
    • Videos: .flv, .wv, .mov (up to 60 MB each)
    • Audio: .mp3 (up to 10 MB each)
    • Text documents: MUST be in .pdf format (up to 10 MB each)

  • TOEFL: 100 
    IELTS:
    DUOLINGO: 120

    International applicants are required to submit evidence of English language proficiency. You are waived from this requirement if you meet any of the following conditions:

    • Your native language is English
    • You have an undergraduate degree conferred by a U.S. accredited university
    • You have an undergraduate degree conferred by a university whose primary language of instruction is English

    If you do not meet one of these conditions, you must submit official English language proficiency test scores. You are strongly encouraged to schedule a language proficiency test appointment as early as possible in order to receive official test scores prior to the application deadline.

    SAIC accepts official scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), International English Language Testing System (IELTS), and Duolingo. The TOEFL Institution Code for SAIC is 1713. Please upload an unofficial copy of your test score results to the International Requirements section of the application form.

  • The department conducts interviews by invitation only. Applicants who pass the preliminary review will be invited to schedule an interview in Mid-February. Notification will be sent by late January. For students at a distance or unable to travel, interviews may be conducted remotely.

  • Dual Degree students writing their thesis in Art History and electing to follow the Design History pathway are expected to take ARTHI 5007 as their methods seminar followed by at least four seminars in the Design History curriculum. Thesis topics should address the history and theory of design or architecture.

    Specialization in Design History within the Master of Arts (MA) in Modern and Contemporary Art History 

    Graduate students in the Department of Art History, Theory, and Criticism's graduate degree programs may elect to follow a specialized pathway in Design History. Coursework in this specialization focuses on the production of knowledge, discourses, practices, and domains of objects that have been understood to fall under the broad category of design. As with the MA in Modern and Contemporary Art History degree as a whole, seminars and research topics focus on the modern and contemporary periods.

    Students following the Design History pathway will study the theories and practices of design and examine the conception, production, interpretation, and consumption of design.

    MA in Modern and Contemporary Art History students electing to follow the Design History pathway are expected to take ARTHI 5007 as their methods seminar, followed by at least four seminars in the Design History curriculum. Thesis topics should address the history and theory of design or architecture.

    Recent graduate seminars and courses in Design History include:

    • ARTHI 5101: Theories of Things: Art/Design/Object
    • ARTHI 5111: Urbanization and Its Discontents
    • ARTHI 5122: Critical Terms in Modern Architecture
    • ARTHI 5547: Typographic Modernity & Print
    • ARTHI 5571: Design and the Body
    • ARTHI 5575: Extraordinary Bodies: Disability/Art/Design
    • ARTHI 4547: Biopolitics and Data Visualization
    • ARTHI 5480: Vernacular, Colonial, Global: Modern Architecture at the End of Empire
    Curricular Requirements for the Design History Pathway36 credit hours total
    ARTHI 5007: History of Art History3 credit hours

    4 graduate seminars (5000-level) in Design History

     

    12 credit hours

    Global Issues seminar (5000 level) that focuses on art worlds outside of Europe and North America or focuses on Global Art Theory.

    A list of courses that satisfies this requirement is available from the department every semester.

    3 credit hours
    2 additional seminars in Art History6 credit hours
    2 interdisciplinary electives (4000-6000 level) or additional Art/Design History seminars6 credit hours
    ARTHI 5999 and ARTHI 6999 Thesis sequence in second year6 credit hours
    Completion of thesis 

    Degree Requirements and Specifications

    1. Completion schedule: Students have a maximum of four years from entry into the program to complete coursework and submit a final, approved thesis. This includes time off for leaves of absence. Credit for Thesis Research and Writing (ARTHI 5999 and 6999) is granted only after the thesis is approved and final copies are submitted to the Department.
    2. Thesis in Progress: Students who have not submitted a finished thesis for review and approval by the end of the final semester of enrollment are given a Thesis in Progress grade (IP). All students with a Thesis in Progress grade (IP) will be charged the Thesis in Progress Fee in each subsequent full semester until the thesis is completed and approved and the grade is changed to Credit (CR). If the statute of limitations is reached without an approved thesis, the grade will be changed to No Credit (NCR).
    3. Transfer credits: A minimum of 30 credit hours must be completed in residence at SAIC. Up to six transfer credits may be requested at the time of application for admission and are subject to approval at that time. No transfer credit will be permitted after a student is admitted.
    4. Curriculum: The program requires 36 credit hours, and each individual course is generally three credit hours. Courses are subject to approval by the Art History Graduate Program Director.
    5. Art History requirement: From the Graduate Seminars and additional courses in Art History, at least one course (3 credit hours) must be taken from the list of courses designated 19th-century art history and at least one course (3 credit hours) designated early-20th-century art history. A list of courses that satisfies this requirement is available from the Department of Art History, Theory, and Criticism every semester.
    6. Global Issues Seminar: If the Global Issues seminar is also designated as Design History, students may use it to also fulfill one of the four graduate seminars in Design History. In this case, students would then be expected to take 3 Additional seminars in Art History rather than 2.
    7. Electives: Electives can be taken from the following departments and programs without additional approval from the Graduate Program Director: Art History, Theory, and Criticism; Visual and Critical Studies; Arts Administration and Policy; Art Education; and Writing. Graduate seminars and upper-level courses in departments other than those listed above may be allowed as electives, contingent upon prior approval from both the Art History Graduate Program Director and the course instructor.
    8. Internship/Co-op Option: Students have the option of taking up to three hours of credit through the co-op internship program. These credit hours can be taken as part of additional courses or electives, but internship credits never count toward the required number of seminar credit hours.
    9. Full-time Status Minimum Requirement: 9 credit hours

    Core Design History Faculty

    • Shiben Banerji, Design History Coordinator and Assistant Professor, Dept. of Art History, Theory, and Criticism
    • Michael Golec, Associate Professor, Dept. of Art History, Theory, and Criticism
    • Bess Williamson, Associate Professor, Dept. of Art History, Theory, and Criticism

World-Class Resources

SAIC students have special access to incomparable resources including the Art Institute of Chicago and its Modern Wing, SAIC’s John M. Flaxman Library and Special Collections, numerous on- and off-campus collections, and public programs.

Students also have at their disposal a diverse array of arts, cultural and community organizations in Chicago, and have the opportunity to work in partnership with them on a variety of projects sponsored and led by the department’s Management Studio. 

On-Campus Opportunities

Students engage directly with current trends in the fields of art history through numerous events and lectures hosted by the Art History department. The Visiting Artists Program has brought in such distinguished artists as Graham Pullin, Arlene Shechet, Anab Jain, Lewis Hyde, Irene Hofmann, Xaviera Simmons, Kendell Geers, Ron Athey, Beatriz Milhazes, and Iñigo Manglano-Ovalle.

Each year, as part of the Lifton Lecture, a prominent scholar presents a public lecture on a topic related to modern and contemporary art history. A theme over the years has been an emphasis on women art historians and their contributions to the field. Students in their final year present their thesis before the department’s faculty and students.

Dual degree students participate in the production of E-merge: journal of arts administration and policy. E-merge is an online journal produced by graduate students in the School of the Art Institute of Chicago’s Master of Arts Administration and Policy and Dual degree programs, featuring collaborations with guest editors from the SAIC Community. The journal is dedicated to fostering creative discussions amongst leading professionals, academics, and students, and provides dual degree candidates with valuable publication and journal-management experience.

Course Listing

Title Catalog Instructor Schedule

Description

Art has been many things to many people. This class introduces students to the history of art and art-like things on Earth from prehistory to ca. 1800 CE. It covers canonical examples from older scholarship alongside works and contexts emerging in recent art histories. Students will learn to perform basic art historical analysis and research, and the course will prepare them to form personal art histories, applying such art histories to their own work. The course surveys historical art in a global scope, from the beginnings of known culture to the dawn of the Industrial Revolution. It introduces students to a range of interdisciplinary frameworks for parsing the production, reception, and conceptualization of art. And it challenges students to think about the relationships between past and present, highlighting how later artists and cultures have engaged earlier art and history. There is a small amount of required reading each week-on average about 20 pages. Written work includes weekly reading responses, two in-class quizzes, an annotated bibliography project, and a take-home final exam.

Class Number

1269

Credits

3

Department

Art History, Theory, and Criticism

Location

Online

Description

This course surveys developments in nineteenth and twentieth century art and architecture. Particular emphasis is placed on theoretical and critical issues, as well as the historical, intellectual, and socioeconomic changes that are reflected or addressed in the works of artists and architects. Note: ARTHI 1001 (or its equivalent) is recommended as a prerequisite for ARTHI 1002.

Class Number

1271

Credits

3

Department

Art History, Theory, and Criticism

Location

Online

Description

This course surveys developments in nineteenth and twentieth century art and architecture. Particular emphasis is placed on theoretical and critical issues, as well as the historical, intellectual, and socioeconomic changes that are reflected or addressed in the works of artists and architects. Note: ARTHI 1001 (or its equivalent) is recommended as a prerequisite for ARTHI 1002.

Class Number

1272

Credits

3

Department

Art History, Theory, and Criticism

Location

Online

Description

This course is a comprehensive survey of the history of furniture, including relevant information on residential architecture, the decorative arts and interior design, from the Neolithic Era until the Twenty-First Century. Special attention is given to the developments that have remained most influential within furniture design today, with particular emphasis on the ancient Egyptians, Greeks and Romans, the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, the Baroque, Rococo and Neoclassical eras, revivalism in the Nineteenth Century, early Modernism in the Arts & Crafts and Art Nouveau movements, Art Deco, the Bauhaus and the International Style, Mid-Century Modernism, Late Modernism and Postmodernism. Through extensive lectures and readings, special focus in this class is devoted to the relationships between furniture and societal customs throughout history, the rise of furniture?s status as a fine art during the Baroque, Rococo and Neoclassical periods, the influence of industrialization, mass production and new technologies and materials on furniture manufacturing in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, furniture?s role in helping to create and define architectural space within interiors of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, and the role of individual narratives in developing unique identities and meanings for furniture throughout history. Students will complete a series of in-class exams along with a final research assignment analyzing a single object chosen from the Art Institute?s furniture collection.

Prerequisites

Prerequisite: Art History Survey Requirement

Class Number

1273

Credits

3

Department

Art History, Theory, and Criticism

Location

Online

Description

This course offers an historical survey of music as a sonic art form from the Futurists to the present day. Emphasis is placed on works that tune the performance environment, explore sound as sculpture, interact with the listener/viewer, and employ intermedia. Class discussions include topics such as basic psycho-acoustics, sound manipulation, conceptual art, installation techniques, and constructivist aesthetics.

Prerequisites

Prerequisite: Art History Survey Requirement

Class Number

1096

Credits

3

Department

Art History, Theory, and Criticism

Location

Online

Description

This course takes a hemispheric approach that unites the Ancient Americas by following the trade routes that moved materials and goods including corn, turquoise, and gold, from the Arctic to Patagonia and connected this vast expanse of land. We start in 12000 BC with the migration of people to different parts of North, South, and Central America and end in 1492 with the arrival of Europeans. Along the way, we consider a diverse range of media, including architecture, basketry, ceramics, textiles, jewelry, painting, sculpture, architecture, and earthworks from across the ancient Americas. Underscoring modes of both continuity and change, we will also survey responses from contemporary artists whose work continues through lines to ancient art made before Conquest.

Prerequisites

Prerequisite: Art History Survey Requirement

Class Number

1098

Credits

3

Department

Art History, Theory, and Criticism

Location

Online

Description

This course will begin with examples of Expressionist Cinema in the masterpieces of 1920s Germany, through to reiterations in the classic Hollywood Film Noirs of the 1940s and 1950s, followed by the reinventions of Neo-Noir and finally, the influence of these works on films throughout Europe and Asia. The class will focus on the aesthetics of Expressionism, one of the dominant art movements of the 20th century, as it appears in film, with special attention to lighting, composition and editing. Likewise, lectures and discussions will also focus on recurrent themes such as urbanization, human psychology, the impact of modernity and gender relations. Screenings and readings may vary, but typical works to be studied include: Nosferatu, Metropolis, Double Indemnity, Kiss Me Deadly, The Long Goodbye, Elevator to the Gallows and Infernal Affairs. Readings will help elucidate these screenings. Through close observation and discussion, students will develop basic skills for analyzing film. The legacy of Film Noir, tends to reappear whenever there is social chaos. Given our present world situation, these films remain as relevant today as ever. Students can expect to write two essay exams covering the assigned screenings and readings and a final research paper.

Prerequisites

Prerequisite: Art History Survey Requirement

Class Number

1284

Credits

3

Department

Art History, Theory, and Criticism

Area of Study

Art/Design and Politics, Gender and Sexuality, Economic Inequality & Class

Location

Lakeview - 1428

Description

This course offers a survey of the history of manga (Japanese comics) from its premodern predecessors to the present. Beginning with narrative picture scrolls in the medieval period, it will touch on forms of humor and political cartooning in the 19th and early 20th centuries, before moving onto multi-page stories, serials, and standalone books within the serially paneled comics medium. Related developments in non-Japanese comics and media like film, animation, illustration, and painting will also be considered. Among the major artists to be considered in this course are: Hokusai, Tagawa Suiho, Tezuka Osamu, Tatsumi Yoshihiro, Shirato Sanpei, Tsuge Yoshiharu, Hagio Moto, Otomo Katsuhiro, Takahashi Rumiko, and Tagame Gengoro. Students will be required to complete weekly readings, including translated manga and historical/interpretive essays, in addition to occasional reading responses, a research paper, and a final exam.

Prerequisites

Prerequisite: Art History Survey Requirement

Class Number

1274

Credits

3

Department

Art History, Theory, and Criticism

Area of Study

Books and Publishing, Comics and Graphic Novels, Illustration

Location

Online

Description

This course explores the expression of social imagination in modern China, from the early 20th century to the present day, through the cinematic medium. Taking a selection of representative films and film criticism particular to the mainland, the course will survey constructions of social space throughout distinct historical periods. These include the mise-en-scene of the 1930s silver screen (Wu Yonggang?' The Goddess), Maoist revolutionary representation (Jiang Qing's model opera-ballets), as well as critical portrayals of globalization in the 21st century (Jia Zhangke's The World).

Prerequisites

Prerequisite: Art History Survey Requirement

Class Number

1283

Credits

3

Department

Art History, Theory, and Criticism

Location

MacLean 608

Description

Since the early 1960s, artists have increasingly experimented with alternative methods of disseminating their ideas, using books or records, occasionally collaborating in periodicals, and other uncategorized projects. Students investigate the increasing acceptability of such activities and discuss a broad variety of publishing, from guerrilla fly-posting through mail-art magazines to the exhibition-in-a-book, including the unconventional artists' bookwork. Examining both well-known examples and obscure occurrences, the course attempts to place alternative art publishing in a contemporary context.

Prerequisites

Prerequisite: Art History Survey Requirement

Class Number

1276

Credits

3

Department

Art History, Theory, and Criticism

Location

MacLean 620

Description

Science fiction is cinema's most colorful genre, and is as old as cinema itself. This screening-and-lecture course will consider a range of classic science fiction features, from the campy to the hyper violent, the preposterous to the mystical. Frequently dismissed as formulaic, the science fiction film is in fact remarkably supple, allowing inventive directors to tweak its conventions for their own creative ends - to create existential drama, biting social satire, or simple psychological terror. Films will include Alien, The Incredible Shrinking Man, Invasion of the Body Snatchers, The Fly, and Westworld.

Prerequisites

Prerequisite: Art History Survey Requirement

Class Number

1278

Credits

3

Department

Art History, Theory, and Criticism

Location

MacLean 1307

Description

The issues of modern philosophy have been inseparable from critical aspects of social modernity, such as the issue of 'capitalism.' From the 18th Century Enlightenment and 1789 French Revolution to the social revolutions of the 19th and 20th centuries, philosophers have radically interrogated problems of consciousness and subjectivity in terms of modern society, and have been concerned with possibilities for social transformation and emancipation. This course begins with the trajectory from Rousseau and Adam Smith to Kant and Hegel, proceeding to Marx and his followers Lukacs, Korsch and Althusser, and opposing accounts of revolutionary possibilities by Heidegger, Foucault and Adorno.

Prerequisites

Prerequisite: Art History Survey Requirement

Class Number

1399

Credits

3

Department

Art History, Theory, and Criticism

Location

Online

Description

In this course we will examine the ecstasy, transgressions, and transformations that occurred largely around queer networks of artistic activity in the United States ca. 1970-99. Focusing on larger cities, New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Detroit, and Minneapolis, we will look at an intermedial roster of often undersung or understudied painters, photographers, dancers, performers, conceptualists, fashion designers, and DJs who honed an aesthetic of excess that critiqued and opened up possibilities both within social conventions and the art world. While this class is not a history of disco, It is nonetheless rooted in the politics of the dancefloor, where friendship, movement, inclusion, and joy can become political expressions of freedom. Topics explored include glamour and celebrity as a mode of critique and celebration (Les Petit Bon Bons, the Miss General Idea Pageants, File Megazine), conceptual and performance gestures that trafficked in vernacular forms (Diana Ross translated through Julius Eastman, Arthur Russell), the voices of other voices in Lipysnka and Pinkietessa, alternative actions and spaces via performances and exhibitions in the storefront windows of Fiorucci and Mayfield Bleu, public performances by The Cockettes and The Whizz Kidz, space making with David Mancuso, Larry Levan, Frankie Knuckles, and Adrian Piper's Funk Lessons, and the politics of partying and friendship around the dance-floor. We will read excerpts and texts by and from Micah Salkind, Peter Shapiro, Deforrest Brown Jr., Giorgio Agamben, madison moore, Albert Goldman, Tim Lawrence, A.A. Bronson, Jose Esteban Munoz. Students will present on one reading or screening, do a midterm creative research project, and a final presentation with a 10 page paper.

Prerequisites

Prerequisite: Art History Survey Requirement OR Graduate Student

Class Number

1285

Credits

3

Department

Art History, Theory, and Criticism

Area of Study

Art/Design and Politics, Gender and Sexuality, Economic Inequality & Class

Location

MacLean 816

Description

This course examines images of women and the work of women artists in India, engaging with broader topics in feminist and postcolonial theory. We will investigate indigenous responses to colonial and to contemporary critiques of the female form in Indian art, discuss the agency of women artists in the twentieth century, and examine how women artists interpreted the female form. This is an advanced undergraduate course that emphasizes research and writing. Artists discussed in this class include Amrita Sher-Gil, Nilima Sheik, Shazia Sikander, Mithu Sen and Pushpamala Students will submit two 3-5page papers and one final studio project. Students will also lead discussion on one of the readings assigned in class.

Prerequisites

Prerequisite: Art History Survey Requirement OR Graduate Student

Class Number

1279

Credits

3

Department

Art History, Theory, and Criticism

Location

Online

Description

Between its incorporation in 1833 and the world's fair of 1933, Chicago was internationally the most important site for development of modern architecture. From the commercial buildings of Burnham and Root or Adler and Sullivan to the domestic architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright and the Prairie School, Chicago was on the 'cutting edge.' This architectural 'century of progress' is explored through field trips and on-site lectures. Chicago and its suburbs are the class's 'museum.'

Prerequisites

Prerequisite: Art History Survey Requirement OR Graduate Student

Class Number

1289

Credits

3

Department

Art History, Theory, and Criticism

Location

Lakeview - 205

Description

This team taught 3 week summer intensive course examines the unique lives, art and garments which have contributed to fashion theory and practices of the past 200 years. Topics introduce style innovators and creators of dress and menswear, relating fashion to cultural influences, subcultures, sculpture, performance art, dance, textiles, interior design, merchandising, journalism and creative writing. Roundtable readings will generate daily discussion while weekly collaborative research projects will lead to group presentations and individually-written essays. Visits to museum exhibitions and studios will inspire responses. For 3 hours daily M-F for 3 weeks, students with diverse interests can gain knowledge of fashion arts history and contemporary fashion practices while strengthening skills in research, speaking and writing.

Prerequisites

Prerequisite: Art History Survey Requirement OR Graduate Student

Class Number

1280

Credits

3

Department

Art History, Theory, and Criticism

Location

Lakeview - 202

Description

This team taught 3 week summer intensive course examines the unique lives, art and garments which have contributed to fashion theory and practices of the past 200 years. Topics introduce style innovators and creators of dress and menswear, relating fashion to cultural influences, subcultures, sculpture, performance art, dance, textiles, interior design, merchandising, journalism and creative writing. Roundtable readings will generate daily discussion while weekly collaborative research projects will lead to group presentations and individually-written essays. Visits to museum exhibitions and studios will inspire responses. For 3 hours daily M-F for 3 weeks, students with diverse interests can gain knowledge of fashion arts history and contemporary fashion practices while strengthening skills in research, speaking and writing.

Prerequisites

Prerequisite: Art History Survey Requirement OR Graduate Student

Class Number

1280

Credits

3

Department

Art History, Theory, and Criticism

Location

Lakeview - 202

Description

Incorporating daily visits to the Art Institute of Chicago, this seminar will examine the history of European and American art from the 1870s to the twentieth century through the focused engagement with objects in the museum collections. Class time will be divided between classroom lectures, discussions of daily reading assignments, and museum visits. In all of these, students will be expected to take an active participatory role. Course topics will be determined in relation to the collections on view, but recurring questions will focus on materiality and display.

Prerequisites

Prerequisite: Art History Survey Requirement OR Graduate Student

Class Number

1281

Credits

3

Department

Art History, Theory, and Criticism

Location

MacLean 920

Description

The thesis, as the final requirement to be fulfilled for the Masters of Art degree in Modern Art History, Theory, and Criticism, demonstrates the student's ability to present a lucid, sustained work of scholarly research and critical thinking on a specific topic in the field of 19th, 20th and 21st-century art. The thesis indicates the student's thorough command of the available documentation and scholarly research on the subject and suggests clearly-defined objectives and a methodologically-sound approach to a fresh assessment of the topic. This seminar assists the student in selecting, researching, analyzing, designing, organizing, and writing the Art History thesis. Students learn how to select and narrow their topic by organizing materials; preparing an outline, abstract, and bibliography; and defending their proposal before a faculty panel. During this semester, they select their thesis committee and complete most of the research. This seminar is required for the Master of Arts in Modern Art History, Theory, and Criticism and is taken in the second or third semester of course work.

Prerequisites

You must be a Master of Art History student to take this course.

Class Number

1282

Credits

3

Department

Art History, Theory, and Criticism

Location

Online

Take the Next Step

Visit the graduate admissions website or contact the graduate admissions office at 312.629.6100, 800.232.7242 or gradmiss@saic.edu

 

Wide shot of a large, classical library

MA Dual Degree Graduate Brochure