A wide shot of a ceramics studio, featuring students working with pottery wheels and other tools.
A silhouette of a person against a blue background.

Kate Lechler

Lecturer

Courses

Title Department Catalog Term

Description

The oldest art depicting boats was created 40,000 years ago. For just as long, the sea–barrier, connector, nurturer, destroyer–has fascinated artists and authors. Its sound calms us; its mystery thrills us; its strength terrifies us. This course will focus on texts that span a variety of nations, languages, time periods, genres, and mediums, all of which explore the collective human experience of the sea. What voices does the ocean use to speak to us, and what does it say? In response to these questions, we’ll read texts by Herman Melville, Rivers Solomon, and Homer; examine ancient myth and Lovecraftian mythos; view illustration and animation by Trungles and Hayao Miyazaki; and listen to sea shanties, Debussy, and clipping. As a First Year Seminar I course, the essay writing focus of this class will be to develop and build skills in writing response and analytical essays related to assigned readings, research, and class discussion. Students in FYS I should expect to write 15 to 20 pages of formal, revisable writing in addition to homework exercises and in-class writing. This writing will take the form of two essays with multiple drafts based on instructor and peer workshop feedback.

Class Number

2174

Credits

3

Description

Food is one of life’s great pleasures and the pursuit of flavor and nutrition has shaped the global map as we know it today. Every culture has food rituals around both its preparation and consumption, while the academic study of food intersects with almost every other topic of study, from economics and biology, to history and art. This course will focus on texts that span a variety of nations, languages, genres, and mediums, all of which explore the collective human experience of food. What do we eat–and when and why? How did our most beloved foods come to be and how do they reach us today? In response to these questions, we’ll read texts by famous food-writers such as Michael Pollan and Samir Nosrat, alongside horror and fantasy stories by Cassandra Khaw and Seanan McGuire. We’ll examine medieval recipes alongside viral TikTok recipes; view Dutch and Flemish still lifes and Warhol paintings; and watch the Hulu show The Bear and Stanley Tucci’s movie Big Night. In their research and writing students can expect to explore the topic of food that most inspires their curiosity, FYS II builds upon the foundational writing skills students began learning in FYS I, with the introduction of more rigorous argumentation and research. Eventually, writing and revision will be more self-directed in this FYS II class, which provides guided experience in writing college-level essays of various kinds. Students should expect to write 20-25 pages of formal, revisable writing as well as homework exercises and in-class writing. This writing will take the form of two essays and a final project, an in-depth revision based on instructor and peer workshop feedback.

Class Number

1493

Credits

3