The New York Times Interviews Joseph Grigely on His Pandemic Practice

A work in progress by the artist Joseph Grigely for the exhibition “Higher! Higher! Lower, Lower. Louder! Louder! Softer, Softer” at the Shimmer exhibition space in Rotterdam. Image courtesy of Joseph Grigely

In a piece on how artists are reimagining their practice and relationship with their audiences during the pandemic, the New York Times spoke to Joseph Grigely, professor of Visual and Critical Studies. Grigely talked about how he's encouraging his students to embrace technology as a way to create different access points for their work. Grigely has been deaf since the age of 10, and his own work is centered around communication. Many of his installations showcase compilations of notes he's passed back and forth with others, documenting everyday conversations that may otherwise have been forgotten. “I see in Covid a lot of people are doing something like that; they are looking at what’s on their desks, what’s on their bookshelves. This kind of slow-life process, it’s something that’s between the still life and life. We’re all in that slow mode now, it seems," Grigely shared.