http://www.andrewyang.net
http://www.andrewyang.com

Bio

Associate Professor, Liberal Arts (2005). BS, 1995, Juniata College; PhD, 2004, Duke University. Publications: LeonardoCurrent Biology;  Interdisciplinary Science Reviews; Evolution & Development; Biological Theory; International Studies in the Philosophy of Science; Insectes Sociaux; Liberal Education; Gastronomica. Exhibitions: 14th Istanbul Biennial; BankART NYK, Yokohama; Work Gallery, Ann Arbor. Invited Talks: Brown University; Kalvi Frontiers of Science; University of Illinois Chicago; ASU-MBL Woods Hole; Northwestern University.


Experience at SAIC

Being at SAIC is like taking part in a gigantic swap meet of ideas, things, and relations constantly made anew.


Personal Statement

"Form, like nature, is one of the most complicated words in the English language. Form is about shape, number, figure, beauty, making, ritual, image, order, cause, relationship, kind, conduct, and character. 'To have good form' describes a way of doing something that is at once about ethics, technics, and practice."
—Donna Haraway, Crystals, Fields, and Fabrics (2004)

My work develops along hybrid spaces and in hybrid forms. I have trained in the biological sciences as well as the visual arts. With this background, I explore the space between disciplines as well as across them, examining the ways in which we negotiate our intimate and troubled relationship to "nature" in theory and practice. The projects take various forms, including academic papers, talks, installations, and zines, with the venues ranging from journals, exhibitions, and talks. In the fall of 2015 I will be a visiting fellow at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin exploring the significance of the Anthropocene hypothesis to archival knowledge.

I teach at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, including biology courses in the Liberal Arts department, as well as studio and thesis advising across sculpture, photography, writing +. I also co-lead SAIC study trips to Japan on science, technology, and society themes and in studio art.


Current Interests

Shaped stones, the Anthropocene, analogies, near-Earth objects

 

Disclaimer: All work represents the views of the INDIVIDUAL ARTISTS & AUTHORS who created them, and are not those of the school or museum of the Art Institute.