McKenzie Wark and Legacy Russell

This event has been postponed and will be rescheduled at a later date

Culture That Loves Us
Thursday, April 16, 2020 - 6:00p.m.
Gene Siskel Film Center
164 N. State St.
Chicago, IL
United States
Julianan Huxtable, BAT 3 (2019). Courtesy of the artist and Reena Spaulings Fine Art, NY/LA.
Julianan Huxtable, BAT 3 (2019). Courtesy of the artist and Reena Spaulings Fine Art, NY/LA.

McKenzie Wark and Legacy Russell: Culture That Loves Us has been postponed for a later date.

Writers McKenzie Wark and Legacy Russell, winners of the 2019 Thoma Foundation Arts Writing Awards in Digital Art, come together for a generative conversation about the impact of the digital age on the body, transness and queerness, and contemporary art. Borrowing the title of their exchange from artist E. Jane’s NOPE (a manifesto) (2016), Wark and Russell screen and discuss E. Jane’s artwork in relation to works by Juliana Huxtable and other media practitioners who are transforming the arenas of art and identity. Wark’s pioneering writing on media and the internet include A Hacker Manifesto (Harvard, 2004), Gamer Theory (Harvard, 2007), and Capital Is Dead: Is This Something Worse? (Verso, 2019). Russell is associate curator of exhibitions at the Studio Museum in Harlem, New York. Her first book GLITCH FEMINISM is forthcoming from Verso Books. 

2015–20, multiple directors, multiple countries, multiple formats, ca 60 minutes followed by audience discussion. 

McKenzie Wark and Legacy Russell in person

Presented in partnership with the Carl & Marilynn Thoma Art Foundation.

Legacy Russell is a curator, writer, and artist who is currently associate curator of exhibitions at the Studio Museum in Harlem. She is the founding theorist of the Glitch Feminism, which seeks to apply the digital as a tool toward resisting gender binary. Legacy’s academic, curatorial, and creative work focuses on gender, performance, digital selfdom, internet idolatry, and new media ritual. Exhibitions and projects include Projects 110: Michael Armitage (organized with Thelma Golden) at the Museum of Modern Art, New York (2019); Dozie Kanu: Function and Radical Reading Room at the Studio Museum in Harlem (both 2019); GLITCH @ NIGHT, a series of multimedia events exploring digital feminism and queer nightlife at Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA) London (2017); and the Wandering/WILDING: Blackness on the Internet at IMT Gallery and ICA London (2016). Her first book GLITCH FEMINISM is forthcoming from Verso Books.

McKenzie Wark is an Australian-born media theorist and professor of culture and media at the New School for Social Research in New York. Wark began writing about digital art in the 1990s, on early internet list servers that brought together new communities of artists, activists, and theorists. Among her books are A Hacker Manifesto (Harvard, 2004), Gamer Theory (Harvard, 2007), The Beach Beneath the Street (Verso, 2011) and Capital Is Dead: Is This Something Worse? (Verso, 2019). 

The Carl & Marilynn Thoma Art Foundation is a pioneering collection of digital art that encompasses artistic innovations in custom-coded and algorithmic software, internet-connected and real-time animation, early computer drawing, interactive technology, video installation, electronic sculpture, and works that utilize LED and LCD displays. The foundation initiated the Arts Writing Awards in Digital Art in 2015. This annual award grants support for established and emerging arts writers in the United States who have made significant contributions or demonstrate great promise to writing about digital art. The foundation is based in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and Chicago. 

Thoma Foundation

Legacy Russell

McKenzie Wark