Since the September 11, 1973 coup that overthrew Salvador Allende, the democratically-elected socialist President of Chile, filmmaker Patricio Guzmán has produced a cycle of films exploring the aftermath of that national trauma. This talk looks at those films, in the context of a larger exploration of artworks which return to difficult pasts, and is part of a forthcoming book titled Now What? The Quandaries of the Radical Past.

Rachel Weiss is a writer, lapsed curator, and Professor in the Department of Arts Administration & Policy

David Getsy discusses Scott Burton's postminimalist theories of performance art in the 1970s and examines his strategic use of cybernetics, art history, and queer culture in his performance at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago in 1977. 

Getsy is Goldabelle McComb Finn Professor of Art History at SAIC, and his books include Abstract Bodies: Sixties Sculpture in the Expanded Field of Gender (Yale 2015), Rodin: Sex and the Making of Modern Sculpture (Yale 2010), Scott Burton: Collected Writings on Art and Performance 1965-1975 (Soberscove 2012), and the anthology of artists writings, Queer, for the Whitechapel Gallery’s “Documents of Contemporary Art” book series (MIT 2016).  His current research projects undertake archive-based recoveries of forgotten queer and genderqueer performance and sculptural practices in late-twentieth-century America. For 2018, he is curating the first retrospective of performance artist Stephen Varble (Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art, New York), and he is also completing a book on Scott Burton’s queer postminimalism and performance in the 1970s, from which this lecture is drawn. http://davidgetsy.academia.edu

 

A workshop on designing protest objects with Hong Kong artist and urbanist Sampson Wong.

Sampson Wong holds a PhD in geography from the University of Manchester, and is currently a lecturer at the Liberal Arts Studies department, Hong Kong Academy for Performing Arts. With research interests on contemporary urbanism, art and the public sphere and socially-engaged creative practices, he divides his time among the roles of artist, independent curator and academic. As an active participant in Hong Kong’s civil society and artistic sphere, he co-founded the Hong Kong Urban Laboratory, emptyscape, Umbrella Movement Visual Archive, Add Oil Team and The Twenties.

OPEN TO SAIC STUDENTS ONLY. Apply for the workshop here: https://tinyurl.com/ycbklhge
*Please apply using your SAIC email. Contact Ryan Deemer with any questions at rdeemer@saic.edu
 

October 4, 2017

The Washington Center Honors SAIC with the 2017 Higher Education Civic Engagement Award

CHICAGO–The School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC), a global leader in art and design education, was honored with the 2017 Higher Education Civic Engagement Award from The Washington Center. The school was selected for its leadership and innovation in civic engagement and was presented with the award during The Washington Center’s annual awards luncheon in Washington, D.C., at the National Press Club on October 2. The Washington Center recognized SAIC’s efforts to bring its art and design education to the communities of Chicago and beyond. These initiatives include:

A discussion with Hong Kong artist Sampson Wong, Jonathan Solomon, Mechtild Widrich, Thomas Kong, Maud Lavin, Celine Setiadi, and Aram Han Sifuentes on global movements and protest creativity, theories of activist objects, and on the relationship between art and resistance. 

Admissions Events

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Meet with us at events across the country and in Chicago.

September 26, 2017

The School of the Art Institute of Chicago Launches Matching Gift Incentive to Help Surpass $50 Million Fundraising Goal

CHICAGO—The School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC), a global leader in art and design education, is closing in on a $50 million goal in its first-ever major public fundraising campaign and has received a gift that will enable the school to launch a matching incentive that will help put it over the finish line for Beautiful/Work: The Campaign for SAIC.

September 25, 2017

Alumni Stories

John McKinnon (dual degree Arts Administration/Art History, 2008) was named Executive Director of the Board of Directors of the Elmhurst Art Museum in August, 2017. He was formerly the Program Director of The Society for Contemporary Art at the Art Institute of Chicago. From 2007 to 2010, he was Assistant Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Milwaukee Art Museum. While at the museum, his exhibitions included BRUCE CONNER; Fifty Works for Fifty States: The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection; Andy Warhol: The Last Decade; Andy Warhol: Pop Star; Act/React: Interactive Installation Art; and On Site: Santiago Cucullu. He has independently organized group exhibitions including works by Robert Heinecken, Paul McCarthy, Jim Nutt, Otto Piene, William Pope.L, DIeter Roth, Ed Ruscha, Peter Saul, and others. He has written for Artforum, Art Papers, X-TRA, and Flash Art.  

Display Date: 

Friday, November 17, 2017

12:10 pm-12:50 pm

Based on her forthcoming book Modernism as Memory: Building Identity in the Federal Republic of Germany, which will appear in 2018 with the University of Minnesota Press, James-Chakraborty’s lecture will compare the political use of memory in Berlin since unification in 1990 versus its economic utility in the country’s former industrial heartland. James-Chakraborty is Professor of Art History at University College Dublin and the former Vincent Scully Visiting Professor of Architectural History at the Yale School of Architecture. Her books include Architecture since 1400 and the edited collections Bauhaus Culture from Weimar to the Cold War and India in Art in Ireland.

Display Date: 

Monday, September 25, 2017

12:10 pm-12:50 pm

How do artists, scholars, and writers approach archival practice?  This talk will explore both the theoretical and practical dimensions of archival work, with a particular look at narratives about Chicago's cultural history.  Drawing on her recent book Chicago Renaissance: Literature and Art in the Midwest Metropolis (Yale, 2017), Liesl Olson will discuss the allure of the archive as a potential source of untold stories.  Illuminating the importance of Chicago's early twentieth-century editors, bookstore owners, gallery owners, and cultural arbiters-many of whom were women-Olson will call attention to what the archive does-and does not-disclose.

Liesl Olson is Director of Chicago Studies at the Newberry Library.  She is the author of Modernism and the Ordinary (Oxford University Press 2009) and the forthcoming Chicago Renaissance: Literature and Art in the Midwest Metropolis (Yale 2017).

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