Immunization and Health Requirements for New Students

Immunizations Required for Enrollment

In accordance with the Illinois College Immunization Code, all students who enroll in 6 or more credit hours per semester must have proof of immunization on file with Health Services by the beginning of preregistration or a registration hold will be placed on their academic record and they will not be permitted to register for the following semester. Students must prove that they have been immunized against the following communicable diseases:

  • Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis -- proof of three doses required
  • Meningococcal conjugate for those under 22 years of age
  • Measles (Rubeola), Mumps, Rubella (German Measles)  -- proof of two doses required

 

Immunization Records are due:

  • July 1, for students admitted for Fall
  • December 20, for students admitted for Spring

 

Instructions for Submitting Immunization Records (Required)

  1. Print the Certificate of Immunity form and ask your health care provider to complete and sign it. Alternately, you may submit relevant records from a school, military, government, clinic/hospital or other official documentation of your vaccination history. Documents must be in English or translated into English. 
  2. Enter your immunization information and upload your supporting documents to the SAIC Health Services Patient Portal. For instructions on using the SAIC Patient Portal view:

 

Instructions for Submitting the Admission Health Record Packet (Recommended)

  1. Print the Admission Health Record Packet and complete the Medical Record Identification, Personal Health History, and Tuberculosis (TB) Risk Assessment Part I. 
  2. Take the Admissions Health Record Packet to your health care provider to complete and sign the Physical Exam and TB Risk Assessment Part II and III (if indicated).
  3. Upload your documents to the SAIC Health Services Patient Portal. Click on the Upload button and select Admissions Health Record Packet under the “Choose document you are uploading” dropdown.

 

Immunization Requirement Details

Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis: Students must provide dates of any combination of three or more doses of diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis containing vaccine. One dose must be the Tdap vaccine. The last dose of vaccine (DTP, DtaP, DT, Td, or Tdap) must have been received within the last 10 years. The minimum time interval between the first and second dose must have been at least 28 days, with the third dose having been received at least six months after the second or last dose of the basic series.

Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccine: All new admissions under the age of 22 must show proof of having at least one dose of meningococcal conjugate (Menactra® or Menveo®) vaccine on or after 16 years of age.

Measles (Rubeola): Students must provide documentation of receipt of two doses of live measles virus vaccine on or after the first birthday. The minimum time interval between each dose must have been at least 28 days. If either dose was given before 1968, proof must be provided that a live virus was administered. Students who cannot obtain records may provide laboratory (serologic) evidence of measles immunity*.

Mumps: Students must provide documentation of receipt of two doses of live mumps virus vaccine on or after the first birthday. The minimum time interval between each dose must have been at least 28 days. If either dose was given before 1968, proof must be provided that a live virus was administered. Students who cannot obtain records may provide laboratory (serologic) evidence of mumps immunity*.

Rubella (German Measles): Students must provide documentation of receipt of two doses of live rubella virus vaccine on or after the first birthday. The minimum time interval between each dose must have been at least 28 days. If either dose was given before 1968, proof must be provided that a live virus was administered. Students who cannot obtain records may provide laboratory (serologic) evidence of rubella immunity*.

*A serology report is a blood test you can have done by your healthcare provider to test for positive antibodies which prove immunity. Lab results must be attached.

Please note: If you were born on or before January 1, 1957, you are exempt from the measles, mumps and rubella requirements, as exposure to disease and natural immunity is assumed. You will, however, need to show proof of immunity to diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis.

Exemptions that will be accepted:

  1. Medical Exemption: Students who have a medical reason that contraindicates vaccination should ask their healthcare provider to complete the Medical Immunization Exemption Form
  2. Religious Exemption: Students who have a religious objection to immunization should complete the Religious Immunization Exemption Form
  3. Pregnancy or Suspected Pregnancy: Students who are pregnant or suspected to be pregnant should ask their healthcare provider to complete the Medical Immunization Exemption Form.

Anyone with a vaccine exemption may be excluded from the College in the event of a disease outbreak in accordance with public health law.

Please note: if you were born on or before January 1, 1957, you are exempt from the measles, mumps and rubella requirements, as exposure to disease and natural immunity is assumed. You will however, need to show proof of immunity to diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis.

Recommended (not required) vaccines for college students:

  • Hepatitis B is a serious infectious disease that attacks the liver and can lead to lifelong infection, liver failure, and even death. The following factors can increase the risk of contracting Hepatitis B: unprotected sex, non-sterile body piercing, tattoos, sharing needles, and travel abroad to countries with high rates of hepatitis B.
  • HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) is a group of viruses that can cause genital warts and cancers of the cervix, vulva, vagina, penis, anus, mouth or throat.
  • Meningitis B is a specific type of meningococcal disease, an illness caused by a bacteria. The vaccines for Meningitis B are Bexsero® and Trumenba®.
  • Varicella (Chickenpox) is a very contagious virus causing a rash, fatigue and fever. While the symptoms are usually mild in children, college students may be more likely to develop serious complications.

CDC: Diseases and Conditions

ACHA:  Immunization Recommendations for College Students